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Today’s Historical Headline: Fidel Castro still running show
Fidel Castro, Cuba’s revolutionary leader-turned-dictator, handed power over to his brother Raul on July 31, 2006. However, Fidel maintained his influence behind the scenes, and continues to make statements and headlines today. Most recently, he’s addressed the North Korean arms-smuggling debacle. 
(Photo from here. Headline from CBS.)

Today’s Historical Headline: Fidel Castro still running show

Fidel Castro, Cuba’s revolutionary leader-turned-dictator, handed power over to his brother Raul on July 31, 2006. However, Fidel maintained his influence behind the scenes, and continues to make statements and headlines today. Most recently, he’s addressed the North Korean arms-smuggling debacle

(Photo from here. Headline from CBS.)

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Today’s Historical Headline: Who’s eligible for Medicare?
President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Social Security Act of 1965 on July 30, 1965, establishing Medicare and Medicaid. The two programs provide healthcare services to those over the age of 65 and to poor families as part of the social safety net. For more on Johnson’s Great Society and its programs, head to PBS.
(Photo from here. Headline from The Deseret News.)

Today’s Historical Headline: Who’s eligible for Medicare?

President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Social Security Act of 1965 on July 30, 1965, establishing Medicare and Medicaid. The two programs provide healthcare services to those over the age of 65 and to poor families as part of the social safety net. For more on Johnson’s Great Society and its programs, head to PBS.

(Photo from here. Headline from The Deseret News.)

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Today’s Historical Headline: Prince Charles and Lady Diana wed amid splendor
On July 29, 1981, Prince Charles and Diana Spencer were married. Although the couple’s marital bliss wasn’t particularly blissful (As Diana said, there were three people in the marriage), they had two sons, William and Harry, and of course, William and his wife, Kate, just had their first son, George. 
(Photo from here. Headline from the Evening Independent.)

Today’s Historical Headline: Prince Charles and Lady Diana wed amid splendor

On July 29, 1981, Prince Charles and Diana Spencer were married. Although the couple’s marital bliss wasn’t particularly blissful (As Diana said, there were three people in the marriage), they had two sons, William and Harry, and of course, William and his wife, Kate, just had their first son, George

(Photo from here. Headline from the Evening Independent.)

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Today’s Historical Headline: Disabilities Act becomes law
President George H. W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act on July 26, 1990. The act protects people with disabilities from discrimination in public places and in places of employment. 
Read more about ADA anniversary celebrations at PBS NewsHour. Also, know your rights: check out the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s fact sheet on the act, as well as the Department of Labor’s page on the act. 
(Photo from here. Headline from the Albany Sunday Herald.) 

Today’s Historical Headline: Disabilities Act becomes law

President George H. W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act on July 26, 1990. The act protects people with disabilities from discrimination in public places and in places of employment. 

Read more about ADA anniversary celebrations at PBS NewsHour. Also, know your rights: check out the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s fact sheet on the act, as well as the Department of Labor’s page on the act. 

(Photo from here. Headline from the Albany Sunday Herald.) 

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Today’s Historical Headline: Doctors cautious on baby hopes
On July 25, 1978, Louise Brown was born - along with quite a few other babies. However, what made Brown’s birth special was that she was the first “test tube baby,” born after her mother underwent in vitro fertilization. Today, the procedure helps many overcome fertility issues and have biological children. 
Brown is now pregnant with her second child - without IVF. 
(Picture from here. Today’s headline comes from the Hendersonville Times-News.)

Today’s Historical Headline: Doctors cautious on baby hopes

On July 25, 1978, Louise Brown was born - along with quite a few other babies. However, what made Brown’s birth special was that she was the first “test tube baby,” born after her mother underwent in vitro fertilization. Today, the procedure helps many overcome fertility issues and have biological children. 

Brown is now pregnant with her second child - without IVF. 

(Picture from here. Today’s headline comes from the Hendersonville Times-News.)

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Today’s Historical Headline: Traficant expelled after final jabs in House
July 24, 2002, was not a good day for James Traficant, a Democrat Representative from Ohio. After being convicted in a federal court of bribery, he was evicted from the house by a vote of 420-1 (He didn’t vote).
(Photo from here. Headline from USA Today.)

Today’s Historical Headline: Traficant expelled after final jabs in House

July 24, 2002, was not a good day for James Traficant, a Democrat Representative from Ohio. After being convicted in a federal court of bribery, he was evicted from the house by a vote of 420-1 (He didn’t vote).

(Photo from here. Headline from USA Today.)

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Today’s Historical Headline: Amy Winehouse, l’etoile filante
On July 23, 2011, singer Amy Winehouse - the “shooting star” - was found dead after a tumultuous public struggle with drugs and alcohol. 
Winehouse’s talent was undeniable; during her brief career she won six Grammys and a host of other awards. 
For more on her career, start with Rolling Stone’s 2007 feature, and also check out the retrospective look on her career published today at the  Londonist.
(Photo from here. Headline from Le Point.)

Today’s Historical Headline: Amy Winehouse, l’etoile filante

On July 23, 2011, singer Amy Winehouse - the “shooting star” - was found dead after a tumultuous public struggle with drugs and alcohol. 

Winehouse’s talent was undeniable; during her brief career she won six Grammys and a host of other awards. 

For more on her career, start with Rolling Stone’s 2007 feature, and also check out the retrospective look on her career published today at the  Londonist.

(Photo from here. Headline from Le Point.)

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Today’s Historical Headline: Charter signed in divided Korea
South Korea’s constitution was proclaimed on July 17, 1948. The Republic of Korea and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea - South and North, respectively - were separate at this time, though war would not occur for another two years. Forbes has an article on the lasting impact of that war on US diplomatic policy. 
For more on the relationship between the two Koreas today, head to USA Today for details on a cyberattack in South Korea, that the nation is blaming on North Korea. GQ also has a great (and bizarre) profile of the man who used to be Kim Jong-Il’s sushi chef. 
(Photo of festivities in South Korea on inauguration day, August 17, 1948, from here. Headline from the Toledo Blade.)
Sorry for the disruption in headlines - new job started a few days ago! 

Today’s Historical Headline: Charter signed in divided Korea

South Korea’s constitution was proclaimed on July 17, 1948. The Republic of Korea and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea - South and North, respectively - were separate at this time, though war would not occur for another two years. Forbes has an article on the lasting impact of that war on US diplomatic policy. 

For more on the relationship between the two Koreas today, head to USA Today for details on a cyberattack in South Korea, that the nation is blaming on North Korea. GQ also has a great (and bizarre) profile of the man who used to be Kim Jong-Il’s sushi chef. 

(Photo of festivities in South Korea on inauguration day, August 17, 1948, from here. Headline from the Toledo Blade.)

Sorry for the disruption in headlines - new job started a few days ago! 

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Today’s Historical Headline: Big U.S. bills to be dropped
On July 14, 1969, the U.S. government removed the $500, $1,000, $5,000 and $10,000 bills from circulation. None of the bills had been printed since 1946, and had mainly been used for transactions by banks. 
In case you were wondering, here’s who graced the banknotes before they were taken out of circulation: 
$500: William McKinley, 25th U.S. President 
$1,000: Grover Cleveland, 22nd and 24th U.S. President  
$5,000: James Madison, fourth U.S. President
$10,000: Salmon P. Chase, sixth U.S. Chief Justice 
If you want to learn more about U.S. currency, check out the Richmond Federal Reserve’s FAQ page on currency. 
(Photo from here. Headline from the Spokane Daily Chronicle.)

Today’s Historical Headline: Big U.S. bills to be dropped

On July 14, 1969, the U.S. government removed the $500, $1,000, $5,000 and $10,000 bills from circulation. None of the bills had been printed since 1946, and had mainly been used for transactions by banks. 

In case you were wondering, here’s who graced the banknotes before they were taken out of circulation: 

$500: William McKinley, 25th U.S. President 

$1,000: Grover Cleveland, 22nd and 24th U.S. President  

$5,000: James Madison, fourth U.S. President

$10,000: Salmon P. Chase, sixth U.S. Chief Justice 

If you want to learn more about U.S. currency, check out the Richmond Federal Reserve’s FAQ page on currency

(Photo from here. Headline from the Spokane Daily Chronicle.)

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Today’s Historical Headline: Race rioting engulfs Newark
Frustrated by unemployment, community degradation, police profiling and other institutional oppression, the African-American community in Newark erupted in anger when a black cab driver was arrested by two white policemen, who beat him to the point that he had to be hospitalized. 
The rioting lasted six days and led to 26 deaths. Listen to a retrospective reports on the riots at NPR. 
(Photo from here. Headline from the Telegraph-Herald.)

Today’s Historical Headline: Race rioting engulfs Newark

Frustrated by unemployment, community degradation, police profiling and other institutional oppression, the African-American community in Newark erupted in anger when a black cab driver was arrested by two white policemen, who beat him to the point that he had to be hospitalized. 

The rioting lasted six days and led to 26 deaths. Listen to a retrospective reports on the riots at NPR

(Photo from here. Headline from the Telegraph-Herald.)